Fly fishing

Breast cancer patients recover at fly fishing retreat

In western North Carolina, a rainy October day could not dampen the morale of a group of women and their fly guides at the annual Casting for Recovery retreat. “It opened a new door for me,” said participant Charlene Coaxum. “This is the first time that I have really spoken about my journey with breast cancer. wanted to hear before, ”Coaxum said. “Cancer is like a death sentence. But more than two years after her diagnosis, Coaxum shared her retirement experience with other women who have faced a similar battle. Trish Turner was diagnosed in 2014. “She’s definitely a different person after the initial shock alone and then the treatment,” Turner said. The women spent a few days together on Logan Lake. “We spend time learning how to throw, how to tie knots and at the same time we also have time to sit down and talk and have some of those chats that you can’t have with your mom or your little one. friend if they don’t go through it too and that’s what makes Casting for Recovery so special, “said Ann Camden, participant coordinator for Casing For Recovery. Camden attended the retreat several years ago and is now a volunteer. “I think Casting for Recovery has given me permission to take charge of my life and redefine who I am,” Camden said. The national nonprofit serves hundreds of women across the country through its retreats every year. “The activity and movement of your arm, especially if you’ve lost lymph nodes, just helps stretch your arm and really get you back in shape if you really stick to it”, Camden said. “It’s u n excellent exercise. But the benefits extend far beyond that. Women find healing in the water and nature around them. “Mentally, it gave me a sense of peace,” Coaxum said. Peace coupled with a newly formed bond, it feels more like brotherhood. “Some keep a brave face, others will wear their hearts on their sleeve, but in all of these experiences when you have had breast cancer, you speak the same language,” says Turner. “There is a truly indescribable trust, honesty and love.” At the end of the retreat, the women take home memories of the water and more. “It might sound so silly, but a new confidence in me, you know, to get out into nature more and find new hobbies,” Turner said. “I think there might even be a fly fishing rod in my future.” “This recovery retreat is such a great support system for someone like me who just didn’t want to talk about it,” Coaxum said. “We were free to express ourselves and to be loved by a large group of women.” To learn more about Casting for Recovery, visit castingforrecovery.org

In western North Carolina, a rainy October day could not dampen the morale of a group of women and their fly guides at the annual Casting for Recovery retreat.

“It opened a new door for me,” said participant Charlene Coaxum. “This is the first time that I have really spoken about my journey with breast cancer. “

Coaxum was diagnosed with breast cancer in 2019.

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“It was a word I never wanted to hear before,” Coaxum said. “Cancer is like a death sentence.

But more than two years after her diagnosis, Coaxum shared her experience during retirement with other women who have faced a similar battle. Trish Turner was diagnosed in 2014.

“It’s definitely a different you after the initial shock alone and then the treatment,” Turner said.

The women spent a few days together on Logan Lake.

“We spend time learning how to throw, how to tie knots and at the same time we also have time to sit down and talk and have some of those chats that you can’t have with your mom or your little one. friend if they don’t go through it too and that’s what makes Casting for Recovery so special, ”said Ann Camden, participant coordinator for Casing For Recovery.

Camden retired several years ago and is now a volunteer.

“I think Casting for Recovery has given me permission to start taking charge of my life and redefine who I am,” Camden said.

The national non-profit organization serves hundreds of women across the country through its retreats each year.

“The activity and movement of your arm, especially if you’ve lost lymph nodes, just helps stretch your arm and really get you back in shape if you really stick to it,” Camden said. “It’s a great exercise.”

But the benefits go far beyond. Women find healing in the water and nature around them.

“Mentally, it gave me a sense of peace,” Coaxum said.

Peace coupled with a newly formed bond, it feels more like brotherhood.

“Some keep a brave face, others will wear their hearts on their sleeve, but in one of those experiences when you’ve had breast cancer, you speak the same language,” Turner said. “There is a trust and an honesty and a love that is truly indescribable.”

At the end of the retreat, the women take home memories of the water and more.

“It might sound so silly, but a new confidence in me, you know, to get out into nature more and find new hobbies,” Turner said. “I think there might even be a fly fishing rod in my future.”

“This recovery retreat is such a great support system for someone like me who just didn’t want to talk about it,” Coaxum said. “We were free to express ourselves and to be loved by a large group of women.”

To learn more about Casting for Recovery, visit castingforrecovery.org

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