BC Fly Fishing Resources http://www.bcflyfishingresources.com/ Wed, 21 Apr 2021 07:43:53 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.7.1 http://www.bcflyfishingresources.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/04/cropped-icon-32x32.png BC Fly Fishing Resources http://www.bcflyfishingresources.com/ 32 32 Fishing report: dry fly opportunities are starting to appear | Outside http://www.bcflyfishingresources.com/fishing-report-dry-fly-opportunities-are-starting-to-appear-outside/ http://www.bcflyfishingresources.com/fishing-report-dry-fly-opportunities-are-starting-to-appear-outside/#respond Wed, 21 Apr 2021 01:00:00 +0000 http://www.bcflyfishingresources.com/fishing-report-dry-fly-opportunities-are-starting-to-appear-outside/

Kootenai River – On Monday, the flow of the Libby dam is 4,000 CFA francs. Flows should remain low until runoff. During the spring months, it is possible to experience flow fluctuations. The inflows to Lake Koocanusa were 6,800 cf / s on Monday and the water temperature at the Libby Dam was 40 degrees. The outbreaks are midges, blue-winged olives, March chestnuts, early caddis and small stone flies. Recommended models are Zebra Midge, Parachute Adams, Purple Haze, Bugmeister, Olive Sparkle Dun, Purple Chubby, BH Prince, Soft SJ Worm, BH Pheasant Tail, BH Rubberleg Stonefly, Big Streamers in White, Pink and Olive, Circus Peanut and black conehead buggers Linehan outfitter, Troy.

Mary Ronan Lake – It’s been about two weeks since the ice broke off and kokanee fishing should start any day. It will take about a month before the start of perch fishing. – Zimmer Bait and Tackle, Pablo.

Koocanusa Lake – Salmon fishing is still slow due to the cold temperatures. Rainbow fishing is fair with recent storm activity. The fishermen had used caps in black, black and silver and black and gold. When it warms up, try trolling flies. – Koocanusa Resort and Marina, Libby.

Madison River, Upper – Small and flashy is the name of the game if you decide to nymph; Green Machines, $ 3 Dips, Purple Deaths, Worms, Shop Vac, Black and Brown Rubberlegs, and Zebra Midges are all good bets. It is essential that your bugs diminish quickly. If you don’t check the bottom on every throw, add weight until you do. The dry fly fishing was quite slow with the constant wind. Streamer fishing was hit or miss, but when turned on it was pretty good. The color of the streamers has been variable lately, but generally black, olive and white are our favorites. Between the lakes there is thick snow in places, but you can easily enter under the dam. The sweet spot seems to be the three dollar zone with excellent opportunities for streamers, sissies and nymphs. Just look at this time the wind can be the kiss of death for dry fly fishing this way. – Montana Troutfitters, Bozeman.


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Fly fishermen will experience the Western Native Trout Challenge http://www.bcflyfishingresources.com/fly-fishermen-will-experience-the-western-native-trout-challenge/ http://www.bcflyfishingresources.com/fly-fishermen-will-experience-the-western-native-trout-challenge/#respond Tue, 20 Apr 2021 23:05:56 +0000 http://www.bcflyfishingresources.com/fly-fishermen-will-experience-the-western-native-trout-challenge/

The Fly Fishers of Davis will hear from Laurie Banks and Ken W. Davis, who will present the Western Native Trout Challenge via the Zoom webinar at 7:30 p.m. on Tuesday, April 27.

Laurie Banks shows off a Coastal Cutthroat Trout during the Western Native Trout Challenge.
Courtesy photo

This presentation aims to motivate people to take up this challenge and introduce fly fishermen to this program. Participants will learn the challenge, tips for completing all levels, locating and identifying fish, planning trips, as well as gear and flies.

Ken Davis is seen fishing in Washington.
Courtesy photo

Banks and Davis have been together for 23 years and a fishing crew for 15 years. They spend their summer vacations fishing and visiting family in Nevada, Idaho, and Montana. After finding out about the Western Native Trout Challenge, they decided to give it a try. Thinking it would take years, they were surprised they took on the challenge in just 15 months.

Banks is a retired high school teacher and was president of California Fly Fishers Unlimited in 2014 and 2015. She sits on their board of directors and co-teaches their Class 101 for Beginner Anglers.

Davis is an aquatic biologist who works on several projects in Lake Berryessa and Putah Creek for Solano County. As a wildlife photojournalist, his images have appeared in over 5,000 periodicals. He has been fly fishing for over 30 years. Ken especially enjoys the fly fishing activities with Banks as they approach it as a team effort.

Although 75 anglers have completed the first level, the couple are two of the five to complete the third and final level and the first to do so.

To register for this Zoom webinar, go to https://zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_e075uXRSTESdIISOc2o4Fw.


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Brood X Cicada will make summer a fisherman’s paradise | News, Sports, Jobs http://www.bcflyfishingresources.com/brood-x-cicada-will-make-summer-a-fishermans-paradise-news-sports-jobs/ http://www.bcflyfishingresources.com/brood-x-cicada-will-make-summer-a-fishermans-paradise-news-sports-jobs/#respond Tue, 20 Apr 2021 06:32:36 +0000 http://www.bcflyfishingresources.com/brood-x-cicada-will-make-summer-a-fishermans-paradise-news-sports-jobs/

ERIE – Anglers expect an angler’s paradise towards the end of May in southeastern Pennsylvania.

Brood X cicadas are expected to emerge after 17 years of sleep, and the protein-rich insects are delicious food for a variety of fish.

Eric Hussar of Lewisburg, commissioner of the Pennsylvania Fish and Boat Commission, anxiously awaits the cicada’s outbreak. He said you can catch trout and bass with these bugs.

“Any type of predatory fish will eat them,” Hussar said, remembering the last time he fished when cicadas emerged. “It’s like a steak for these fish. Like a big filet mignon. It’s quite an incredible sight to see.

Hussar said during the peak there will be insects on the ground and in the trees and some will fall into the water. “It’s like a protein bar” for the fish, he said.

He said sporting shops that cater to fly fishermen should soon have a variety of imitation cicadas that anglers should stock up on in anticipation of the outbreak.

“It’s a unique experience. … You don’t see this often, ” Said Hussar.

Hussar said cicada flies should be fished in the same way as popper lures used overwater for bass.

For equipment, Hussar suggests fly rods of 4, 5 or 6 weights with a heavy tip. He said to drift your fly cicada where you see fish coming up or where you think there will be fish in the water.

“Just give it a shake,” he said about the fly moving along the water. “They will nibble them.”

Hussar enjoys fly fishing on the Susquehanna while kayaking to reach different parts of the river. He said the cicada outbreak would be a nice change from the flies you see every year.

“We can not wait to be there,” he said about the emergence of several weeks.

“What makes this incredible is that fish are masters of efficiency”, said George Daniel of the fish taking advantage of the abundance of insects that will be available during this outbreak.

Daniel is the lead instructor of the fly fishing program at Penn State University and is a guide. He is a former member of the Team USA fly fishing team.

One of its favorite fish to catch is carp, and during this emergence, carp will rise up to catch insects.

“Just because of the amount of protein on the surface” carp and catfish will rise up to feed on them, Daniel said. “This is truly a once-in-a-lifetime fishing opportunity. Not just for trout, but for anything that eats what’s in the water.

He said fish can’t get enough of these bugs and it could be one of the easiest and best times to catch a variety of fish.

Daniel suggests keeping the fly models fairly simple and easy to replace. He also suggests that anglers fish a little below the surface when fishing pressure increases. He believes that a partially submerged fly can be one of the most productive ways to fish.

Daniel recorded a video on YouTube that reveals his top three “must have” fly models for Brood X.

When will the emergence actually occur? Daniel said it depends on many factors, including how quickly the ground heats up.

“Being able to leave on a whim and be prepared”, he said about planning a trip.

Daniel said an emergence like the one predicted will make fishermen in their 40s or 60s want to live 17 years longer for the next cicadas to emerge.

“In all honesty, this hatch could be amazing,” Daniel said, while noting that cicadas are emerging in different parts of the country and that there are anglers who follow the location of the outbreak every year because the fishing is so good.

Ross Purnell, editor and publisher of Harrisburg-based Fly Fisherman magazine, said Daniel was a master fly fisherman and he took his advice. Purnell also said that the flies made by Blane Chocklett are excellent imitations of cicadas to use during emergence.

Purnell said fly fishermen are interested in tracking outbreaks and so are cicadas. The excitement of this event is that “The fish become gluttons and stuff themselves with these things.”

Purnell said anglers should think about bigger fish such as largemouth and smallmouth bass and older trout and carp that are used to feeding.

He said now would be a good time when you hear the cicadas “Roaring in the trees.”

Purnell expects good fishing to last until July and anglers shouldn’t get too excited when you start to see cicadas. “You have to give it a few weeks. The best fishing is when (cicadas) mate and start to die. “

He stresses that you should fish near heavily forested areas with slower bodies of water that will allow cicadas to float longer than faster currents. “The longer they are able to float, the more likely the fish are to find them”, he said.

Insects have been hiding beneath the surface since 2004, feeding on the sap of plant roots, according to Michael J. Raupp, professor emeritus of entomology at the University of Maryland, in an interview with USA TODAY.

Once they are ripe, the “Large brood” will emerge in 15 states where they will spend two to four weeks in late May and early June “Courting, mating, stealing, driving people crazy, being devoured by everything,” including humans like Raupp.

Adult cicadas will lay their eggs in trees, and the eggs will hatch 4-6 weeks later in more than a dozen states. The offspring will return underground until 2038. They will also make a lot of noise. According to Raupp, cicadas can emit sounds between 80 and 100 decibels, which is equivalent to a low-flying plane or a lawn mower.

Periodic cicadas emerge in huge groups called broods. Twelve broods of cicadas emerge every seven years and three broods every 13 years, Raupp said.

Two broods appear to have disappeared, including brood XI, which was last seen in Connecticut in 1954. Almost every year somewhere in the country, a periodic brood will emerge.

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British Columbia Expands AstraZeneca Vaccination Program, Lowering Age of Residents 40 and Over http://www.bcflyfishingresources.com/british-columbia-expands-astrazeneca-vaccination-program-lowering-age-of-residents-40-and-over/ http://www.bcflyfishingresources.com/british-columbia-expands-astrazeneca-vaccination-program-lowering-age-of-residents-40-and-over/#respond Tue, 20 Apr 2021 05:34:49 +0000 http://www.bcflyfishingresources.com/british-columbia-expands-astrazeneca-vaccination-program-lowering-age-of-residents-40-and-over/

The Canadian Press

A look at COVID-19 vaccinations in Canada on Tuesday, April 20, 2021

The latest COVID-19 immunization figures in Canada at 4 a.m. ET on Monday, April 20, 2021. In Canada, provinces are reporting 269,775 new vaccinations administered for a total of 10,243,418 doses administered. Nationwide, 932,807 people, or 2.5% of the population, have been fully immunized. The provinces administered doses at a rate of 27,028,004 per 100,000 population. To date, 4,700 new vaccines have been delivered to provinces and territories, for a total of 12,667,610 doses. The provinces and territories used 80.86% of their stock of available vaccine. Please note that Newfoundland and Labrador, Prince Edward Island, Nova Scotia, New Brunswick and the Territories generally do not report daily. Newfoundland and Labrador reports 26,302 new vaccines administered in the past seven days for a total of 136,349 doses administered. The province administered doses at a rate of 260.391 per 1,000. In the province, 1.85% (9,674) of the population were fully immunized. So far, 4,700 new vaccines have been delivered to Newfoundland and Labrador, for a total of 173,840 doses. The province has received enough vaccine to deliver a single dose to 33% of its population. The province used 78.43 percent of its available vaccine supply. Prince Edward Island reports 8,567 new vaccines administered in the past seven days for a total of 39,504 doses administered. The province administered doses at a rate of 249.034 per 1,000. In the province, 5.88% (9,325) of the population were fully immunized. No new vaccine has been delivered to Prince Edward Island for a total of 53,545 doses delivered to date. The province has received enough vaccine to deliver a single dose to 34% of its population. The province used 73.78 percent of its available vaccine supply. Nova Scotia reported 57,440 new vaccines administered in the past seven days, for a total of 207,563 doses administered. The province administered doses at a rate of 212.689 per 1,000. In the province, 3.31% (32,255) of the population were fully immunized. No new vaccine has been delivered to Nova Scotia for a total of 316,500 doses delivered to date. The province has received enough vaccine to deliver a single dose to 32% of its population. The province used 65.58% of its available vaccine supply. New Brunswick reports 48,322 new vaccines administered in the past seven days for a total of 200,587 doses administered. The province administered doses at a rate of 257.15 per 1,000. In the province, 2.41% (18,812) of the population were fully immunized. No new vaccine has been delivered to New Brunswick for a total of 255,205 doses delivered to date. The province has received enough vaccine to deliver a single dose to 33% of its population. The province used 78.6% of its available vaccine supply. Quebec reports 41,177 new vaccines administered for a total of 2,399,934 doses administered. The province has administered doses at a rate of 280.476 per 1,000. No new vaccine has been delivered to Quebec for a total of 2,836,485 doses delivered to date. The province has received enough vaccine to deliver a single dose to 33% of its population. The province used 84.61% of its available vaccine supply. Ontario reports 66,897 new vaccines administered for a total of 3,904,778 doses administered. The province administered doses at a rate of 265.829 per 1,000. In the province, 2.36% (346,005) of the population were fully immunized. No new vaccine has been delivered to Ontario for a total of 4,852,885 doses delivered to date. The province has received enough vaccine to deliver a single dose to 33% of its population. The province used 80.46 percent of its available vaccine supply. Manitoba reports 5,788 new vaccines administered for a total of 341,926 doses administered. The province administered doses at a rate of 248.312 per 1,000. In the province, 5.07% (69,822) of the population were fully immunized. No new vaccine has been delivered to Manitoba for a total of 479,010 doses delivered to date. The province has received enough vaccine to deliver a single dose to 35% of its population. The province used 71.38% of its available vaccine supply. Saskatchewan reports 7,043 new vaccines administered for a total of 352,169 doses administered. The province administered doses at a rate of 298.662 per 1,000. In the province, 3.64% (42,893) of the population were fully immunized. No new vaccine has been delivered to Saskatchewan for a total of 396,475 doses delivered to date. The province has received enough vaccine to deliver a single dose to 34% of its population. The province used 88.83% of its available vaccine supply. Alberta reports 18,175 new vaccines administered for a total of 1,165,223 doses administered. The province administered doses at a rate of 264.70 per 1,000. In the province, 5.30% (233,340) of the population were fully immunized. No new vaccine has been delivered to Alberta for a total of 1,449,695 doses delivered to date. The province has received enough vaccine to deliver a single dose to 33% of its population. The province used 80.38% of its available vaccine supply. British Columbia reports 98,069 new vaccines administered for a total of 1,380,160 doses administered. The province administered doses at a rate of 268.954 per 1,000. In the province, 1.72% (88,151) of the population were fully immunized. No new vaccine has been delivered to British Columbia for a total of 1,696,370 doses delivered to date. The province has received enough vaccine to deliver a single dose to 33% of its population. The province used 81.36 percent of its available vaccine supply. The Yukon reports 1345 new vaccines administered for a total of 45,391 doses administered. The territory administered doses at the rate of 1,087.705 per 1,000. In the territory, 48.71% (20,326) of the population were fully immunized. No new vaccine has been delivered to the Yukon for a total of 59,500 doses delivered to date. The territory has received enough vaccine to administer a single dose to 140% of its population. The territory used 76.29% of its available vaccine supply. The Northwest Territories reports 3,429 new vaccines administered for a total of 44,646 doses administered. The territory administered doses at a rate of 989.517 per 1000. In the territory, 42.71% (19,271) of the population were fully immunized. No new vaccine has been delivered to the Northwest Territories for a total of 56,300 doses delivered to date. The territory has received enough vaccine to administer a single dose to 120% of its population. The territory used 79.3% of its available vaccine supply. Nunavut reports 719 new vaccines administered for a total of 25,188 doses administered. The territory administered doses at a rate of 650.416 per 1000. In the territory, 28.23% (10,933) of the population were fully immunized. No new vaccine has been delivered to Nunavut for a total of 41,800 doses delivered to date. The territory has received enough vaccine to administer a single dose to 110% of its population. The territory used 60.26% of its available vaccine supply. * Data Notes: Figures are compiled by the COVID-19 Open Data Working Group based on the latest publicly available data and are subject to change. Note that some provinces report weekly, while others report the same day or the previous day’s numbers. The vaccine doses given do not match the number of people inoculated because approved vaccines require two doses per person. Vaccines are currently not given to children under the age of 18 and those with certain health problems. In some cases, the number of doses administered may appear to exceed the number of doses dispensed, as some provinces have taken additional doses per vial. This report was automatically generated by the digital data bureau of The Canadian Press and was first published on April 20, 2021. The Canadian Press


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Our outdoor activities: fishing during a break in bad weather | Local sports news http://www.bcflyfishingresources.com/our-outdoor-activities-fishing-during-a-break-in-bad-weather-local-sports-news/ http://www.bcflyfishingresources.com/our-outdoor-activities-fishing-during-a-break-in-bad-weather-local-sports-news/#respond Mon, 19 Apr 2021 23:01:00 +0000 http://www.bcflyfishingresources.com/our-outdoor-activities-fishing-during-a-break-in-bad-weather-local-sports-news/

As I glided my jig over the subtle pull of the bottom of the moving river, I felt a sense of dead weight and lifted the tip of the cane to see the slight bend confirming that my cold, covered hands. gloves could barely detect.

I finished the climb in a hurry and the tip of the hook of my parrot-colored jig found its place in the jaw of the walleye at the other end. Soon the splashing and flipping golden-sided fish made its way to the net under the gray early afternoon skies like the one a few minutes before it, and I knew my buddy Kevin and I were on a good set. of fish.

It was a solid job to wipe the cold water of the Missouri River off my hands to drop the 16 inch into the fishpond before blowing a breath through them, drying them on my pants, and re-breastfeeding.

This has been the story of two springs so far in the open water season, with March hot and sunny, and April being cold and windy with more snow in the past two weeks than the previous month and probably at some places, in January. . I often find myself bemoaning the change and strangely asking for early spring conditions instead of what we find now.

The fast-forward movement suddenly stopped with running fish seemingly reversing their course or at least standing still in small places like the break line in the side channel of the river where we found them. While I normally hunted for spawning bass on the lake to the north or flipped a fly for sustainable trout in a handful of nearby tanks, walleye were a welcome break and offered a new learning experience on water that I wanted more and more. to know better with each hookset.

“I’ve always said walleyes are easy to catch,” Kevin said of our situation while referring to another, “it’s hard to find them,” he laughed.

After a few stops in similar side channels, the loop between the fastest stretch in the side water – which was about a throw or two wide at best, but an incredible 22-foot depth in the middle – was the where we found them, mostly male walleye in the 14-16 inch range which provided quick action. The challenge, after locating the fish, was to secure the hook. We probably started as many walleyes as we sailed, as the cold fingers and attention span distracted by sleet, rain and wind reduced how quickly we loaded the fishpond.

But a pattern appeared for me and I reported it to my friend. Every time my jig came out of the depths, about two-thirds of a cast-iron length behind the boat, it got stuck on a small rise in the silty river bottom before breaking loose and moving the boat. along the edge of the apartment. There, on the break line, the walleyes were waiting, and more often than not, I felt the sensation of dead weight, a light tapping, or that not quite right sensation of a fish on the other end.

Although it took a while to factor in the slight disturbance in the orderly recovery, it all came together when my penultimate fish entered the tank and we decided to troll back home. , starting first with the upper edge of the side channel. , where my friend grabbed and released a bigger female, before I ended the day with one last keeper.

As spring has suddenly come to a halt in recent days and cold temperatures and wintry mixtures of rain, sleet and snow fill the air, the break has certainly produced some great fishing despite the conditions.

Finding what we were looking for during the break at the fork in the river where the walleye had stopped for at least an afternoon was a welcome consolation and well worth the relaxation… in our outdoors.


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NSDAR’s John Bartram Section Learns About Stream Preservation http://www.bcflyfishingresources.com/nsdars-john-bartram-section-learns-about-stream-preservation/ http://www.bcflyfishingresources.com/nsdars-john-bartram-section-learns-about-stream-preservation/#respond Mon, 19 Apr 2021 22:31:36 +0000 http://www.bcflyfishingresources.com/nsdars-john-bartram-section-learns-about-stream-preservation/

At a recent meeting of the John Bartram Chapter of the National Society Daughters of the American Revolution, Cheryl Harrelson spoke about environmental conservation and practices to reduce / reverse damage to our waterways.

Harrelson, a graduate of the University of Colorado Watershed Program, provided photos showing before and after treatments that had been applied to various water harvesting projects in her home state of Wyoming.

Cheryl Harrison and Cindy Kolevar, vice-regent of the John Bartram chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution.

She stressed that it is important to look at the big picture to determine what can and cannot be done to restore rivers.

Consideration is given to the damage that may occur to the fish population when the shoreline is altered. Fly fishing is a major sport in Wyoming, with fishermen coming from all over to fish for trout in their rivers.

The photos showed how best to preserve stream flow to allow for better flow by using rocks and boulders to slow erosion and give fish the opportunity to repopulate.

She ended her presentation by saying that she would be returning to Wyoming this summer to get back to fly fishing, a favorite pastime.


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Federal Government Expands COVID-19 Benefits to Small Businesses, Adds Recruitment Program http://www.bcflyfishingresources.com/federal-government-expands-covid-19-benefits-to-small-businesses-adds-recruitment-program/ http://www.bcflyfishingresources.com/federal-government-expands-covid-19-benefits-to-small-businesses-adds-recruitment-program/#respond Mon, 19 Apr 2021 21:56:49 +0000 http://www.bcflyfishingresources.com/federal-government-expands-covid-19-benefits-to-small-businesses-adds-recruitment-program/

The Canadian Press

The latest figures on COVID-19 in Canada for Monday, April 19, 2021

The last number of confirmed cases of COVID-19 in Canada at 4 a.m. ET on Monday, April 19, 2021. There are 1,121,498 confirmed cases in Canada. Canada: 1,121,498 confirmed cases (87,925 active, 1,009,950 resolved, 23,623 deaths). * The total number of cases includes 13 confirmed cases among repatriated travelers. There were 7,593 new cases on Sunday. The rate of active cases is 231.35 per 100,000 people. In the past seven days, there have been a total of 59,023 new cases. The seven-day moving average of new cases is 8,432. There were 32 new deaths reported on Sunday. In the past seven days, 294 new deaths have been reported. The seven-day moving average of new reported deaths is 42. The seven-day moving average death rate is 0.11 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 62.16 per 100,000 people. 29,907,670 tests were performed. Newfoundland and Labrador: 1,043 confirmed cases (26 active, 1,011 resolved, six deaths). There was a new case on Sunday. The rate of active cases is 4.98 per 100,000 people. In the past seven days, there have been 14 new cases. The seven-day moving average of new cases is two. No deaths have been reported in the past week. The overall death rate is 1.15 per 100,000 people. There were 234,141 completed tests. Prince Edward Island: 170 confirmed cases (10 active, 160 resolved, zero deaths). There were three new cases on Sunday. The rate of active cases is 6.26 per 100,000 people. In the past seven days, there have been a total of eight new cases. The seven-day moving average of new cases is one. No deaths have been reported in the past week. The overall death rate is zero per 100,000 people. There were 134,704 completed tests. Nova Scotia: 1,807 confirmed cases (49 active, 1,691 resolved, 67 deaths). There were seven new cases on Sunday. The rate of active cases is five per 100,000 people. In the past seven days, there have been a total of 39 new cases. The seven-day moving average of new cases is six. There were no new deaths reported on Sunday. In the past seven days, one new death has been reported. The seven-day moving average of new reported deaths is zero. The seven-day moving average death rate is 0.01 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 6.84 per 100,000 people. There were 464,263 completed tests. New Brunswick: 1,788 confirmed cases (154 active, 1,601 resolved, 33 deaths). There were 10 new cases on Sunday. The rate of active cases is 19.71 per 100,000 people. In the past seven days, there have been a total of 66 new cases. The seven-day moving average of new cases is nine. No deaths have been reported in the past week. The overall death rate is 4.22 per 100,000 people. 283,622 tests were performed. Quebec: 336,952 confirmed cases (13,449 active, 312,701 resolved, 10,802 deaths). There were 1,344 new cases on Sunday. The rate of active cases is 156.85 per 100,000 people. In the past seven days, there have been a total of 10,569 new cases. The seven-day moving average of new cases is 1,510. There were nine new deaths reported on Sunday. In the past seven days, 60 new deaths have been reported. The seven-day moving average of new reported deaths is nine. The seven-day moving average death rate is 0.1 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 125.98 per 100,000 people. There were 7,813,292 tests performed. Ontario: 416,995 confirmed cases (41,588 active, 367,691 resolved, 7,716 deaths). There were 4,250 new cases on Sunday. The rate of active cases is 282.26 per 100,000 people. In the past seven days, there have been a total of 30,387 new cases. The seven-day moving average of new cases is 4,341. There were 18 new deaths reported on Sunday. In the past seven days, 164 new deaths have been reported. The seven-day moving average of new reported deaths is 23. The seven-day moving average death rate is 0.16 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 52.37 per 100,000 people. There were 13,328,247 tests performed. Manitoba: 36,159 confirmed cases (1,688 active, 33,512 resolved, 959 deaths). There were 170 new cases on Sunday. The rate of active cases is 122.38 per 100,000 people. In the past seven days, there have been a total of 946 new cases. The seven-day moving average of new cases is 135. One new death was reported on Sunday. In the past seven days, a total of 10 new deaths have been reported. The seven-day moving average of new reported deaths is one. The seven-day moving average death rate is 0.1 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 69.53 per 100,000 people. 626,901 tests were performed. Saskatchewan: 38,160 confirmed cases (2,742 active, 34,953 resolved, 465 deaths). There were 289 new cases on Sunday. The rate of active cases is 232.63 per 100,000 people. In the past seven days, there have been a total of 1,856 new cases. The seven-day moving average of new cases is 265. A new death was reported on Sunday. In the past seven days, 11 new deaths have been reported. The seven-day moving average of new reported deaths is two. The seven-day moving average death rate is 0.13 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 39.45 per 100,000 people. 723,594 tests were performed. Alberta: 170,795 confirmed cases (17,935 active, 150,820 resolved, 2,040 deaths). There were 1,516 new cases on Sunday. The rate of active cases is 405.6 per 100,000 people. In the past seven days, there have been a total of 9,893 new cases. The seven-day moving average of new cases is 1,413. There were three new deaths reported on Sunday. In the past seven days, 27 new deaths have been reported. The seven-day moving average of new reported deaths is four. The seven-day moving average death rate is 0.09 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 46.13 per 100,000 people. There were 3,913,177 tests performed. British Columbia: 117,080 confirmed cases (10,259 active, 105,291 resolved, 1,530 deaths). There were no new cases on Sunday. The rate of active cases is 199.29 per 100,000 people. In the past seven days, there have been a total of 5,221 new cases. The seven-day moving average of new cases is 746. No new deaths were reported on Sunday. In the past seven days, 21 new deaths have been reported. The seven-day moving average of new reported deaths is three. The seven-day moving average death rate is 0.06 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 29.72 per 100,000 people. There were 2,349,763 completed tests. Yukon: 76 confirmed cases (two active, 73 resolved, one death). There were no new cases on Sunday. The rate of active cases is 4.76 per 100,000 people. In the past seven days, there have been a total of two new cases. The seven-day moving average of new cases is zero. No deaths have been reported in the past week. The overall death rate is 2.38 per 100,000 people. There were 8,740 completed tests. Northwest Territories: 43 confirmed cases (one active, 42 resolved, zero deaths). There were no new cases on Sunday. The rate of active cases is 2.21 per 100,000 people. In the past seven days, there have been no new cases in total. The seven-day moving average of new cases is zero. No deaths have been reported in the past week. The overall death rate is zero per 100,000 people. There were 16,904 completed tests. Nunavut: 417 confirmed cases (22 active, 391 resolved, four deaths). There were three new cases on Sunday. The rate of active cases is 55.9 per 100,000 people. In the past seven days, there have been a total of 22 new cases. The seven-day moving average of new cases is three. No deaths have been reported in the past week. The overall death rate is 10.16 per 100,000 people. There were 10,246 completed tests. This report was automatically generated by the digital data bureau of The Canadian Press and was first published on April 19, 2021. The Canadian Press


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Toyota’s first electric vehicle to hit the road in 2022 http://www.bcflyfishingresources.com/toyotas-first-electric-vehicle-to-hit-the-road-in-2022/ http://www.bcflyfishingresources.com/toyotas-first-electric-vehicle-to-hit-the-road-in-2022/#respond Mon, 19 Apr 2021 20:26:44 +0000 http://www.bcflyfishingresources.com/toyotas-first-electric-vehicle-to-hit-the-road-in-2022/

The Canadian Press

The latest figures on COVID-19 in Canada for Monday, April 19, 2021

The last number of confirmed cases of COVID-19 in Canada at 4 a.m. ET on Monday, April 19, 2021. There are 1,121,498 confirmed cases in Canada. Canada: 1,121,498 confirmed cases (87,925 active, 1,009,950 resolved, 23,623 deaths). * The total number of cases includes 13 confirmed cases among repatriated travelers. There were 7,593 new cases on Sunday. The rate of active cases is 231.35 per 100,000 people. In the past seven days, there have been a total of 59,023 new cases. The seven-day moving average of new cases is 8,432. There were 32 new deaths reported on Sunday. In the past seven days, 294 new deaths have been reported. The seven-day moving average of new reported deaths is 42. The seven-day moving average death rate is 0.11 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 62.16 per 100,000 people. 29,907,670 tests were performed. Newfoundland and Labrador: 1,043 confirmed cases (26 active, 1,011 resolved, six deaths). There was a new case on Sunday. The rate of active cases is 4.98 per 100,000 people. In the past seven days, there have been 14 new cases. The seven-day moving average of new cases is two. No deaths have been reported in the past week. The overall death rate is 1.15 per 100,000 people. There were 234,141 completed tests. Prince Edward Island: 170 confirmed cases (10 active, 160 resolved, zero deaths). There were three new cases on Sunday. The rate of active cases is 6.26 per 100,000 people. In the past seven days, there have been a total of eight new cases. The seven-day moving average of new cases is one. No deaths have been reported in the past week. The overall death rate is zero per 100,000 people. There were 134,704 completed tests. Nova Scotia: 1,807 confirmed cases (49 active, 1,691 resolved, 67 deaths). There were seven new cases on Sunday. The rate of active cases is five per 100,000 people. In the past seven days, there have been a total of 39 new cases. The seven-day moving average of new cases is six. There were no new deaths reported on Sunday. In the past seven days, one new death has been reported. The seven-day moving average of new reported deaths is zero. The seven-day moving average death rate is 0.01 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 6.84 per 100,000 people. There were 464,263 completed tests. New Brunswick: 1,788 confirmed cases (154 active, 1,601 resolved, 33 deaths). There were 10 new cases on Sunday. The rate of active cases is 19.71 per 100,000 people. In the past seven days, there have been a total of 66 new cases. The seven-day moving average of new cases is nine. No deaths have been reported in the past week. The overall death rate is 4.22 per 100,000 people. 283,622 tests were performed. Quebec: 336,952 confirmed cases (13,449 active, 312,701 resolved, 10,802 deaths). There were 1,344 new cases on Sunday. The rate of active cases is 156.85 per 100,000 people. In the past seven days, there have been a total of 10,569 new cases. The seven-day moving average of new cases is 1,510. There were nine new deaths reported on Sunday. In the past seven days, 60 new deaths have been reported. The seven-day moving average of new reported deaths is nine. The seven-day moving average death rate is 0.1 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 125.98 per 100,000 people. There were 7,813,292 tests performed. Ontario: 416,995 confirmed cases (41,588 active, 367,691 resolved, 7,716 deaths). There were 4,250 new cases on Sunday. The rate of active cases is 282.26 per 100,000 people. In the past seven days, there have been a total of 30,387 new cases. The seven-day moving average of new cases is 4,341. There were 18 new deaths reported on Sunday. In the past seven days, 164 new deaths have been reported. The seven-day moving average of new reported deaths is 23. The seven-day moving average death rate is 0.16 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 52.37 per 100,000 people. There were 13,328,247 tests performed. Manitoba: 36,159 confirmed cases (1,688 active, 33,512 resolved, 959 deaths). There were 170 new cases on Sunday. The rate of active cases is 122.38 per 100,000 people. In the past seven days, there have been a total of 946 new cases. The seven-day moving average of new cases is 135. One new death was reported on Sunday. In the past seven days, a total of 10 new deaths have been reported. The seven-day moving average of new reported deaths is one. The seven-day moving average death rate is 0.1 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 69.53 per 100,000 people. 626,901 tests were performed. Saskatchewan: 38,160 confirmed cases (2,742 active, 34,953 resolved, 465 deaths). There were 289 new cases on Sunday. The rate of active cases is 232.63 per 100,000 people. In the past seven days, there have been a total of 1,856 new cases. The seven-day moving average of new cases is 265. A new death was reported on Sunday. In the past seven days, 11 new deaths have been reported. The seven-day moving average of new reported deaths is two. The seven-day moving average death rate is 0.13 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 39.45 per 100,000 people. 723,594 tests were performed. Alberta: 170,795 confirmed cases (17,935 active, 150,820 resolved, 2,040 deaths). There were 1,516 new cases on Sunday. The rate of active cases is 405.6 per 100,000 people. In the past seven days, there have been a total of 9,893 new cases. The seven-day moving average of new cases is 1,413. There were three new deaths reported on Sunday. In the past seven days, 27 new deaths have been reported. The seven-day moving average of new reported deaths is four. The seven-day moving average death rate is 0.09 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 46.13 per 100,000 people. There were 3,913,177 tests performed. British Columbia: 117,080 confirmed cases (10,259 active, 105,291 resolved, 1,530 deaths). There were no new cases on Sunday. The rate of active cases is 199.29 per 100,000 people. In the past seven days, there have been a total of 5,221 new cases. The seven-day moving average of new cases is 746. No new deaths were reported on Sunday. In the past seven days, 21 new deaths have been reported. The seven-day moving average of new reported deaths is three. The seven-day moving average death rate is 0.06 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 29.72 per 100,000 people. There were 2,349,763 completed tests. Yukon: 76 confirmed cases (two active, 73 resolved, one death). There were no new cases on Sunday. The rate of active cases is 4.76 per 100,000 people. In the past seven days, there have been a total of two new cases. The seven-day moving average of new cases is zero. No deaths have been reported in the past week. The overall death rate is 2.38 per 100,000 people. There were 8,740 completed tests. Northwest Territories: 43 confirmed cases (one active, 42 resolved, zero deaths). There were no new cases on Sunday. The rate of active cases is 2.21 per 100,000 people. In the past seven days, there have been no new cases in total. The seven-day moving average of new cases is zero. No deaths have been reported in the past week. The overall death rate is zero per 100,000 people. There were 16,904 completed tests. Nunavut: 417 confirmed cases (22 active, 391 resolved, four deaths). There were three new cases on Sunday. The rate of active cases is 55.9 per 100,000 people. In the past seven days, there have been a total of 22 new cases. The seven-day moving average of new cases is three. No deaths have been reported in the past week. The overall death rate is 10.16 per 100,000 people. There were 10,246 completed tests. This report was automatically generated by the digital data bureau of The Canadian Press and was first published on April 19, 2021. The Canadian Press


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Conservation Corner: The Barbel Society Otter Petition http://www.bcflyfishingresources.com/conservation-corner-the-barbel-society-otter-petition/ http://www.bcflyfishingresources.com/conservation-corner-the-barbel-society-otter-petition/#respond Mon, 19 Apr 2021 20:22:20 +0000 http://www.bcflyfishingresources.com/conservation-corner-the-barbel-society-otter-petition/

Some of you will have heard of the recent Barbel Society petition to remove otters from the list of protected species in this country. What you don’t all know is that this caused a major rift between BS and the Angling Trust, a rift that has been brewing for some time now. For all of us who do not fish exclusively for stocked fish behind otter fences, this is an important issue. But where are we all, both the experienced fishermen of Thomas Turner and you, discerning and conscientious fishermen? It is in many ways difficult.

It must be a shame that these two organizations disagree on this matter. TA and BS have shown great energy and positivity over the past few years, and both show a laudable desire to get things done. In angling, most of us agree that all of this energy needs to be concerted, not diverted, and that we should speak with one voice on all the big issues of the day. This is clearly not the case here, and the cliché “irresistible force and stationary object” comes to mind.

Let’s be clear that otters eat fish, especially non-native fish in smaller, shallower habitats. Older, weakened specimens are particularly vulnerable, as are all fish in the coldest winter weather. The BS is also perhaps correct that England, at least, has perhaps a higher density of otters than for some time, following widespread releases at the end of the last century and the stopping hunting in recent decades.

The TA retorts that this petition has no chance of persuading MPs to sanction otter controls, no matter how many fishermen sign it. He also argues that initiating it presents a real risk of distancing us from a mainstream audience that is lukewarm to our sport anyway. In addition, the TA is adamant that there is no silver bullet to improve fish stocks, especially in our rivers. In their eyes, the way forward is to fight against pollution, abstraction and river desecration in all its forms.

A rational but cautious approach would be to support TA here. After all, throughout the fishery – at the time of the Covid negotiations – he has proven he has the ear of the government. However, are we ever going to win public opinion as anglers? Environmentalists usually regard fish as the creatures of least concern, and this disdain is reflected every week in every arm of the media. Many members of the public know all about meerkats, but couldn’t tell a trout from a tench.

This indisputable stance against fish is one of the reasons why nothing of real utility has been done to improve naturally reared fish stocks of all species, in all rivers, over the past thirty or forty years. . Anglers of all disciplines in most areas are tired of seeing nothing to bring back the fish and naturally wonder when something positive will ever be done. There is hardly an experienced river fisherman who cannot name endless unnecessary programs launched by statutory bodies which have had no positive impact on stock levels.

The point is, if our rivers contained the fish stocks they should contain, then the impact of otters would be acceptable to all of us. If rivers like Ouse, Teme, and Wensum had a good barbel head, then the otters and the Society in question would happily coexist. The real crisis is that we have never had so many fishery scientists working in this country and we have never had so few natural river fish, be it salmon, roach or minnows. . If the TA and BS could come together to address this situation, we would love to see our river fish restored to healthy numbers. Otters or not.

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Injured seaside gull calls out anglers – Monterey Herald http://www.bcflyfishingresources.com/injured-seaside-gull-calls-out-anglers-monterey-herald/ http://www.bcflyfishingresources.com/injured-seaside-gull-calls-out-anglers-monterey-herald/#respond Mon, 19 Apr 2021 20:10:16 +0000 http://www.bcflyfishingresources.com/injured-seaside-gull-calls-out-anglers-monterey-herald/

SEASIDE – A call is being made to ask fishermen in the area to be careful about leaving lures and other fishing gear after a seagull was recently rescued in Seaside after being discovered so abused by a lure it was unable to eat or drink.

The SPCA’s Monterey County Wildlife and Rehabilitation Center rescued the western gull after it was found with several hooks embedded in its face, upper and lower beak, and left wing.

When he was first seen he was still able to fly and avoid capture, but as time passed and the condition of the seagull deteriorated, the SPCA staff took a turn for the worse. was warned by residents of Noche Buena Street and was able to save him and transport him to his rehabilitation center.

“The gull was emaciated and very dehydrated,” said Beth Brookhouser, SPCA vice president of communications. “Our wildlife rescue team gave him pain relievers, intravenous fluids and antibiotics, and put him to sleep to remove the hooks and heal his injuries.

The next day the gull was alert and ate on its own, but it was still weak and needed several weeks to recover.

Brookhouser said the SPCA wanted community members to properly dispose of broken or leftover fishing gear and never leave fishing lines, hooks, lures or bait behind. Most local fishing sites offer designated fishing gear disposal containers, she said.

When fish are caught and released with hooks still inside, a gull or other predator will consume it and itself be seriously injured by the hook. Brookhouser has asked catch and release fishermen to use barbless hooks.

“If you find an animal tangled in the fishing line, contact the SPCA,” she says. “Do not try to remove the barbed hooks yourself, as they can cause more damage.”

The SPCA Wildlife Center is available for emergency wildlife rescues 24 hours a day. To report injured, sick or orphaned wildlife in Monterey County, please call 831-264-5427.

Each year, the SPCA Wildlife Center rescues over 2,500 injured or orphaned wildlife. Those interested in donating visit www.SPCAmc.org/donate.


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